2017 POLICY ADVOCACY PRIORITIES
 

Legislative bills ARC is CO-SPONSORING

During this legislative session, ARC is collaborating with several advocacy organizations to provide support with advocacy efforts for the following reform measures:
 

SB 10/SB 42 (Hertzberg/Bonta) – The California Bail Reform Act (the Act) will ensure that people are not held in dangerous, overcrowded jails after an arrest simply because they cannot afford to post bail. The effect of the Act will be to ensure that people return to court as required and that the public is protected, while ending the current bail system’s cruel discrimination against low-income Californians and people of color. Click here to learn more.

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SB 190 (Lara/Mitchell)  This measure will end the harmful, unlawful, and costly assessment and collection of administrative fees against families with youth in the juvenile system. This bill will foster youth rehabilitation and the reentry of youth into their families and communities. Click here to learn more.

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SB 312 (Skinner) - This measure would restore a youth’s ability to seal a juvenile court record involving a past WIC Section 707 (b) listed offense committed at age 14 or older, and therefore allow these Californians to go on to lead productive lives without suffering the negative employment, educational, housing and other economic exclusions and social exclusions. Click here to learn more.

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SB 394 (Lara/Mitchell) – This measure would bring California law into compliance with the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Montgomery v. Louisiana (2016), and give individuals serving life without parole for crimes they committed as youths under 18 years-old the opportunity to work for parole. Click here to learn more.

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SB 395 (Lara/Mitchell) - This measure would safeguard young people’s rights under the United States and California Constitutions by requiring that youth under 18 consult with counsel prior to waiving their Miranda rights. This will preserve youth’s constitutional rights and protects the integrity of our criminal justice system. Click here to learn more.

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SB 439 (Lara / Mitchell) – This measure would establish a minimum age for prosecution in juvenile court in California, protecting children under 12 years old from the harms and adverse consequences of justice system involvement and encouraging more effective alternatives to court involvement. Click here to learn more.

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SB 620 (Bradford) - This measure would allow a court, in the interest of justice and at the time of sentencing, to strike a sentence enhancement for using or discharging a firearm when a person is convicted for committing a felony, consistent with other enhancements. Click here to learn more.

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Bills ARC is Supporting 

SB 142 (Beall) – would encourage judges to consider community mental health treatment during sentencing. SB 142 also re-invests savings from reduced prison costs into effective community-based services with incentives to create a positive cycle of effective treatment and reduced crime. Click here to learn more.

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SB 143 (Beall) - would allow people confined to a state mental hospital to reenter the community for treatment. By allowing equal access to Proposition 36 (2012) and Proposition 47 (2014), this population would be able to access community mental health centers and other support networks. If the person is found to no longer be a danger to public safety, then community treatment would allow them more treatment options and access to their natural support systems such as family and friends. Click here to learn more. 

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SB 180 (Mitchell) - would free-up funds for community-based treatment programs and community investment, generally, by repealing the three-year sentence enhancement for prior drug convictions. Click here to learn more.

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AB 90 (Weber) – would address accuracy and fairness in the collection and accessing of gang allegations through CalGang and other shared gang databases, including enacting reforms outlined in the 2016 audit of shared gang databases released by the California State Auditor. Click here to learn more.

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AB 864 (McCarty) - would allow the Executive Director at the California Conservation Corps (CCC) to consider applications to the CCC from individuals 18-25 years old who are on probation. Click here to learn more.

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AB 1008 (McCarty) - would prohibit employers from inquiring into or reviewing a job applicant’s conviction history until after that applicant has received a conditional offer. This bill would also clarify the standards an employer must apply when considering an applicant’s conviction history. Click here to learn more.

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AB 1058 (Gipson) - will authorize a waiver of the $46 / unit community college student fee for youth who are younger than 25 years-old and are former wards of the juvenile court and were placed in out-of-home care in connection with that status after reaching 16 years-old. Click here to learn more.

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AB 1114 (Garcia) - strengthen the Supervised Population Workforce Training Grant Program established by AB 2060 (V.M. Perez) in 2014.  Investing in workforce development opportunities for reentry populations is a critical step towards expanding their access to well-paying jobs and careers, reducing recidivism rates, improving community safety, and generating overall net state savings.  AB 1114 makes adjustments to the Supervised Population Workforce Training Program to expand the eligible target population to include people on parole, require applicants to include a partnership with a community based organization that works with the reentry population, authorize multi-year grant allocations, and strengthen the prioritization of work-based learning activities. Click here to learn more.

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AB 1308 (Stone) - would require the Board of Parole Hearings to conduct youth offender parole hearings for people sentenced to state prison who committed those specified crimes when they were 25 years of age or younger.  This would essentially extend SB 261 from age 23 to 25. Click here to learn more.

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AB 1448 (Weber) - which will codify the existing Elderly Parole Program, granting continued and formalized parole consideration to individuals ages 60 and older who have been incarcerated for at least 25 years. Click here to learn more.